Bring cutting-edge care to the pets of Northwest Arkansas

The Best Friends Pet Resource Center in Northwest Arkansas will be the first of its kind in the region. Picture a warm and welcoming community space serving pets and people, with large play yards and an enrichment center for dogs, impressive condos and climbing trees for cats, and plenty of opportunities for people to interact with the animals and with each other.

Built from the ground up, the Best Friends Pet Resource Center will have dedicated areas for:

  • Pet adoption
  • Enrichment, socialization and behavioral programs
  • A low-cost spay/neuter and medical clinic
  • A community pantry with pet food and supplies
  • A pet transport hub
  • Educational exhibits and messaging
  • Volunteer, foster and community cat programs
  • A coalition headquarters
  • Training rooms for animal welfare professionals
  • Collaboration with social services organizations

The Best Friends Pet Resource Center in Northwest Arkansas will be the largest facility for animals in the region and will serve an estimated 13,000 cats and dogs each year. The region is stronger together, which is why the center will support animal shelters and rescue groups across Northwest Arkansas, including those in Bella Vista, Bentonville, Centerton, Fayetteville, Lowell, Siloam Springs and Springdale.
 

Your impact

With goals this big, the animals need you more than ever. Annually, the pet resource center will:

  • Find loving homes for around 2,000 cats and dogs through adoption
  • Help around 2,400 outdoor cats through trap-neuter-return efforts
  • Give around 2,400 pets lifesaving lifts from local shelters to other organizations for adoption
  • Perform around 6,000 low-cost spay/neuter surgeries for pets in the community

Give now »

 

For some communities, the pet resource center will be a total game-changer. It will be somewhere to turn for advice and assistance, where there was none before. I hope it unifies workers in the animal services field around a common goal of saving as many lives as possible.”

Justine Lentz, superintendent, Fayetteville Animal Services