Miniature poodle recovers from surgery to help with incontinence

Patches the miniature poodle who had surgery for her incontinence challenges“She's going to have a great Christmas,” Donna Buck-Davis says of her new family member, Patches. The miniature white poodle has gone to the most perfect place for the holidays: the North Pole (a city in Alaska, not the North Pole). But it’s still a pretty special Christmas story.

Irresistibly cute and only two years old, Patches was overlooked in a Los Angeles city shelter because of a medical issue. From there, Patches found her way to the Best Friends Pet Adoption and Spay/Neuter Center in Mission Hills. But the sweet little dog still had no luck finding a family, and after some time came to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary, where we hoped she would have better luck finding the right home.

Miniature poodle with incontinence challenges

It turned out that Patches was incontinent; her bladder didn’t work properly. Not everyone is interested in adopting a dog who can’t make it outside to go to the bathroom. Dr. Patricia Kupanoff, a visiting veterinary specialist, explains that the problem made the young poodle “very susceptible to urine scalding (burning from urine that is left on the skin) and urinary tract infections.” During their recent visit to the Sanctuary, Dr. Kupanoff and fellow veterinary specialist Dr. Catherine Popovitch performed surgery to reroute Patches’ urinary tract, with the hope of fixing the bladder problem, improving her quality of life, and boosting her chances of being adopted.

Recovery from surgery

Though Patches recovered really well from the surgery, it wasn’t a quick fix. Her bladder had never been used, so it would take months for it to stretch, expand and function properly, if it ever would. But the spirited little dog was completely undaunted by this, and, once she was feeling well enough, she went to live and play with a few other small dogs in the Best Friends laundry room. “She doesn't know she is different,” Angela Rovetto, Patches’ former caregiver in L.A. who visited the Sanctuary to spend some quality time with Patches, adds.

As it turns out, Patches isn’t just friendly and sweet; she also has a sense of humor and doesn’t take herself too seriously. Perhaps that’s why Angela and housekeeper Dara Merrifield agree that nothing gets her down. “She is really calm for her age, but can be funny and silly,” Dara explains. Patches liked to shimmy around the laundry room wearing tutus.

A special dog adoption

Patches the dog looking to the side in the laundry room at Best Friends Animal SanctuaryWith a spirit like hers, it’s no wonder Patches found the perfect home in spite of her medical issue. And, though there is reason to believe her condition will continue to improve now that she’s had the surgery, her adopter, Donna, doesn’t care whether or not Patches is ever fully continent. In fact, Donna was interested in Patches because of her special needs – not in spite of them. “Handicapped dogs have special personalities,” she says. “They really appreciate and repay the love and kindness you give them, and they are super warm and affectionate.” Special-needs dogs also know they are being rescued and helped, and therefore they bond more quickly and strongly.

As for Patches herself, she felt perfectly at home in the North Pole on the very first weekend with her new family, and she’s already enjoying belly rubs and baths. Best of all, Patches has established a great relationship with Donna’s other dogs, including Muppett, a Yorkie/poodle mix who (because his back legs are deformed) walks on his front legs. What began as a great Christmas gift for Donna herself – taking in a dog who needed her – turned out to be a wonderful gift for Patches and the rest of the Buck-Davis family as well.

Learn more about adoptable dogs at the Sanctuary.

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Photos by Molly Wald